FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

The Hobbit: Ringing it dry?

Are 13 dwarves too many? Is one book not enough?
By PETER KEOUGH  |  December 10, 2012

thehobbit_junket

Are 13 dwarves too many? Is one book not enough? These were questions raised at the press conference for Peter Jackson's The Hobbit: An UnexpectedJourney. It's the first of three two-and-a-half-hour films adapting J.R.R. Tolkien's prequel to his Lord of the Rings trilogy, which Jackson had also adapted into three epic-length movies.

"It kind of surprised us a bit, too," said Jackson at the press conference for the film. "At the beginning, there were only two films. But the book was written at a very breathless pace. Really major events are covered in just a few pages. Plus, in The Return of the King there are a hundred pages of material that Tolkien meant to include in The Hobbit. All this gave us a lot to work with."

So it wasn't just a way to squeeze out another franchise?

"It's not a franchise!" stormed Ian McKellen in his most intimidating Gandalf voice. "These are films! This isn't X-Men. Anyone who thinks that Peter Jackson operates in response to market forces doesn't know him very well. Ask any nine-year-old. They haven't just seen Lord of the Rings once. They've seen it three times. In one day!"

Besides, he added, the films let him explore Gandalf's romantic side.

"There's a scene in which Galadriel [Cate Blanchett] adjusted my hair," he says. "I'm still a little shaky."

  Topics: Features , Peter Jackson, movie, film,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH