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On the distant planet Baab, in this animated feature, lives a family of aliens who must learn to cherish one another. They are Scorch Supernova (Brendan Fraser), an arrogant astronaut; his brother, Gary (Rob Corddry), a nerdy technician; and Gary's son, Kip (Jonathan Morgan Heit), and wife, Kira (Sarah Jessica Parker). Their story is a family-film cliché from a galaxy not so far, far away. When Scorch bumbles into captivity on Earth, it's up to Gary to finally grow a pair and step out from behind the keyboard to rescue his brother. When Gary himself becomes imprisoned in Area 51 by Agent Shanker (William Shatner), he is forced to devise an alien weapon that will grant Shanker intergalactic domination. Directed by novice Cal Brunker, Escape references an array of other films, such as Toy Story, Independence Day, and The Artist (of all things), and sometimes mixes wit with its bromides. But thanks to the Weinstein Company's insistence on low-rent animation, this might please young kids but torment discerning parents.

› 95m › Boston Common + suburbs

  Topics: Reviews , Movies, review, film
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