FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Let My People Go!

By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 26, 2013
1.5 1.5 Stars



First-time French director Mikael Buch makes it easy to categorize his characters in this sometimes funny, often strident farce. People are Jewish, goyish, gay, straight, Finnish, French, old, young, or some combination of the above — though they all share a neurotic whininess. Reuben (a fluttery Nicolas Maury), for example, is very gay. He's also French and Jewish, and has found his paradise in a cartoon-colored Finnish town where he lives with his blond boyfriend and works as a Tati-esque postman. Then, in a scene oddly evoking both A Simple Plan and Pee-wee's Big Adventure, the serpent enters Eden in the form of a package containing 200,000 euros. For vague and contrived reasons Reuben then must return to Paris, where his family prepares for Passover, and there everything unravels into a mess of spilled secrets and heavy-handed gags. Though the film alludes repeatedly to the story of Exodus, it remains bound to hysterical stereotypes and hyperbolic plotting.

  Topics: Reviews , Movies, review, film
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH