FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Driving Lessons

Teaching the rules of the road
By PETER KEOUGH  |  October 18, 2006
2.5 2.5 Stars

Unlike Hollywood, British filmmakers see the value of putting older actresses to work. The current formula is the old Harold and Maude shtick: disaffected young man or teen learns how to live from dotty dowager, and vice versa. Joan Plowright got the nod in Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont; in Jeremy Brock’s debut feature it’s Julie Walters, and she’s a hoot and a holler as “lady actress” Evie Walton, muse and dominatrix for hopelessly adenoidal and poetic 17-year-old Ben Marshall (Rupert Grint, a/k/a Ron Weasley from Harry Potter). They make a fine couple, whether he’s washing vomit out of her hair after he finds her passed out blotto or driving her (illegally — he has only a learner’s permit) to some desperate recital at the Edinburgh International Festival. Unfortunately, the rest of the cast, especially Laura Linney as Ben’s Bible-thumping and minister-humping adulterous mom, need to learn the rules of the road.

On the Web
Driving lessons's Web site: http://www.sonyclassics.com/drivinglessons/

Related: The girls of summer, Review: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, A Thousand Years of Good Prayers, More more >
  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Movies, Harry Potter,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
More Information
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH