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Fast Food Nation

Hold the fictional fixings
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 15, 2006
2.5 2.5 Stars

The line between factual documentary and fictional re-creation, if it ever existed, has disintegrated before the assault of Fahrenheit 9/11, Syriana, and now Richard Linklater’s Fast Food Nation. Based on the devastating 2001 bestseller by Eric Schlosser, a deconstruction of modern capitalism by way of the fast-food industry, Linklater’s version forgoes analysis and evidence for fictitious representation and dramatic conflict. Written by Schlosser and Linklater, the film spins together a Crash-like fugue of story lines all tied in with “Mickey’s” burger chain. All serve as awkward mouthpieces for the book’s thesis that the exploitation of labor, natural resources, and moral backbone to slake the greed of the few and the unrestrained consumption of the masses will bring us all to the apocalyptic equivalent of the kidney room. If I could have it my way, I’d have Fast Food without the fictional fixings, all factual meat and analytical bone.

On the Web
Fast Food Nation's Web site:http://www.foxsearchlight.com/fastfoodnation/

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  Topics: Reviews , Richard Linklater, Eric Schlosser, FAST FOOD NATION
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