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The Situation

Love in the Sunni Triangle
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 28, 2007
2.0 2.0 Stars
070222_inside_situation

That situation in Iraq sure is something. And as if the IEDs, the death squads, the car bombs, the sectarian warfare, and Iran weren’t enough, we have to wonder whether brave and blonde American journalist Anna (Connie Nielsen) will find happiness with disillusioned US intelligence officer Dan (Damian Lewis) or with hunky, idealistic Iraqi photographer Zaid (Mido Hamada). Philip Haas’s film does examine the woes of this unfortunate country with more acumen than, say, the Bush administration. On the other hand, its depictions of the warring sides tend to be cartoonish and black and white despite Dan’s assertion that “there is no truth.” At any rate, the vivid background adds pizzazz to the tepid triangle at The Situation’s heart, with Anna and Dan making love as small arms rattle in the background. As for the latest on the Sunni Triangle, given that 90 percent of recent “news” consists of Anna Nicole Smith updates, this film is as good a resource as any.
  Topics: Reviews , Politics, Espionage and Intelligence, Anna Nicole Smith,  More more >
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