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Curiously refreshing

Digging deep at the Boston Underground Film Festival
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 21, 2007

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DANTE’S INFERNO: Sean Meredith, like Dante, has an agenda.

The pickings this year at the ninth Boston Underground Film Festival are relatively slim. I’m sure the number of independent films and videos made on minimal budgets with maximum ambition and little respect for conventions or good taste hasn’t declined, especially in this age of YouTube. Perhaps the glut of such efforts has diluted the genre. Perhaps the Internet has drawn off some of the more accomplished, daring, and transgressive filmmakers. Whatever the reason, I found this BUFF a little undernourished.

To their credit, the programmers have stuck to their subterranean roots. I’m referring in particular to one of the festival’s best films, Melody Gilbert’s URBAN EXPLORERS: INTO THE DARKNESS (2007; Harvard Square March 24 at 5:15 pm, with Gilbert), a savvy, freewheeling documentary about the growing movement of postmodern spelunkers and adventurers of the title. Maybe these people have too much spare time on their hands, compelled as they are to climb into sewers and break into derelict buildings, ignoring “No Trespassing” and “Danger” signs to see what’s hidden. Or maybe they’re the latest in the tradition of those driven to cross the limits of the known and the acceptable. Bearing monikers like Slim Jim, Katwoman, and Danarchy, they have in recent years utilized the Internet to expand and organize, hooking up with others like themselves around the world

Gilbert profiles some of these explorers, who take her on tours of fecal-dripping sewers, abandoned Scottish insane asylums, and bone-littered Parisian catacombs. The film at times seems a combination of cable shows like The World’s Most Haunted Places and Dirty Jobs, except that the stills and videos evince a haunting, surreal beauty. A visit to an abandoned NASA site, a deep pit in the Everglades housing the remains of the world’s largest rocket engine, proves especially ironic: the relics of the space program serving as a new generation’s final frontier.

Buried artifacts of a different kind surface in Benjamin Meade’s AMERICAN STAG (2006; Brattle March 22 at 7:30 pm, with Meade), a meager documentary of “stag” or “blue” movies, the short amateur porn flicks that entertained horny male audiences until video and the Internet rendered them obsolete. The grainy, silent, black-and-white celluloid fragments from as far back as the dawn of cinema demonstrate that the mechanics of tawdry desire haven’t changed much over the decades. But more than the naked bodies, it’s the anonymous, vulnerable faces that stir the imagination. Unfortunately, Meade interrupts these images with an assortment of talking heads — academics and “celebrity” experts. Do we really need to hear Adam Corolla or Chris Gore recalling that first experience of watching a porn film?

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Related: Czech, please, Route 666, Let’s undo the movies, More more >
  Topics: Features , Entertainment, Movies, David Lynch,  More more >
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