FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Chalk

Funny but undecidedly pendantic
By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 12, 2007
3.0 3.0 Stars
isnidechalk[1]
CHALK: A fictitious Texas high school gone awry.

Mike Akel’s film chronicles a year at a fictitious Texas high school from the point of view of its misfit teaching staff. There’s the third-year history teacher who doesn’t know anything but knows how to get along with the kids. There’s the first-year teacher who knows his stuff but is hopeless at connecting with his students. There’s the first-year assistant principal who finds the grind of administration much more daunting than teaching, and her friend the PE teacher who tries to exploit their relationship for favors. Sound funny yet? In fact, Akel brings funny dialogue and wry timing to a film that isn’t quite sure how pedantic it wants to be.
  Topics: Reviews , Mike Akel
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH