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Great World of Sound

Sleek, funny, sad
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 28, 2007
3.0 3.0 Stars
TRAILER_sound_1inside
GREAT WORLD OF SOUND: Martin is more than your everyday indie hero.

Failed ambitions and general fecklessness characterize Martin (Tommy Smothers look-alike Pat Healy) in Craig Zobel’s sleek, funny, sad film. Moreover, Martin is dominated by a girlfriend who makes silly art. So when he gets a job reeling in wanna-be musicians for the dicy record-production company of the title, his path seems clear. Perhaps so, but his sotto voce sarcasm and long looks of compassion suggest hidden depths, and boosted by the jolly pragmatism of his sales buddy Clarence (a terrific Kene Holliday), he becomes something more than your everyday indie hero. 106 minutes | Coolidge Corner
  Topics: Reviews , Craig Zobel, Pat Healy, Kene Holliday
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