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The Signal

Too many weird gimmicks
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 20, 2008
2.5 2.5 Stars
The_Signal2_inside
The Signal

There should be a rule in science fiction that there can’t be more than one weird gimmick. If you’re already got a broadcast that drives everyone nuts, you don’t need a dystopian city called Terminus. And on top of that, don’t break the film into a triptych of narratives related by different filmmakers. David Bruckner directs “Transmission One: Crazy Love,” in which Mya (Anessa Ramsey) leaves her lover, who begs her to flee with him from Terminus. The tone is spooky, reminiscent of Chris Marker’s La jetée. Jacob Gentry’s “Transmission Two: Jealousy Monster” picks up the story with Mya’s husband, Lewis (AJ Bowen), who doesn’t need much of a signal to nudge him into insane violence. The deadpan gore would fit easily into Grindhouse. And in “Transmission Three: Escape from Terminus,” Dan Bush restores the film to the unnerving intensity of the beginning. The message about the toxic media comes through loud and clear; otherwise, The Signal is mixed. 99 minutes | Boston Common + Fenway + Fresh Pond + Circle/Chestnut Hill + suburbs
  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Science Fiction, Jacob Gentry,  More more >
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