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His last year at Marienbad

Alain Robbe-Grillet: 1922–2008
By PETER KEOUGH  |  February 26, 2008
3.5 3.5 Stars

The film, then, is a Rorschach test that reveals more about the interpreter than about itself. What does it say about Robbe-Grillet, now gone to the great M in the sky? His forbidding, cryptic façade notwithstanding, I’ll wager he was just another romantic softie. In subsequent films, such as his best, La belle captive (1983), and his last, Gradiva (2006), he pursued with increasing debauchery and desperation the same theme of unattainable love. It was his story and he was sticking with it, even though in the end it didn’t earn him an alibi from death.

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