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The Unforeseen

A warning, both essayistic and collagist
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 5, 2008
3.0 3.0 Stars
The_Unforeseen_inside
The Unforeseen

When humanity finally succumbs to environmental suicide because of greed, denial, cowardice, and stupidity, nobody will be able to say we weren’t warned. Real-estate speculation is something else — the consequences of a seemingly good deal can be, as the title of Laura Dunn’s complex documentary notes, unforeseen. That might be the excuse of up-from-his-bootstraps entrepreneur Gary Bradley, who bought up a big parcel of land in Austin, only to see both his development and the environment go to pot. Dunn portrays Bradley as almost likable, but her sympathy lies with the Austin voters who mobilize and pass a referendum to protect their resources, only to have their will undone when a new governor — guess who? — takes office. The Unforeseen takes its place among such essayistic, collagist, and often brilliant films as Darwin’s Nightmare and Manda Bala. The world may be doomed, but documentaries are better than ever. 88 minutes | Kendall Square
  Topics: Reviews , Laura Dunn, Manda Bala
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