FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Pedro

An inspiring life reduced to sound bites, clichés, and hugs
By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 28, 2009
1.0 1.0 Stars


VIDEO: The trailer for Pedro

Dustin Lance Black won an Oscar for the screenplay of Milk — probably that film's weakest element. Those who wonder what a Black screenplay might look like without the benefit of Gus Van Sant or Sean Penn should check out this bio-pic of AIDS activist and Real World San Francisco star Pedro Zamora (DaJuan Johnson), who died of AIDS in 1994, at the age of 22.

There's no other reason to see the film. Directed by Nick Oceano, it ignores the conflict between the real and its media fabrication in reality shows and instead exploits whatever simulated mode — mock-documentary, mock-re-enactment, mock-talking-heads-interview — works best for cheap emotional effect or as an opportunity to preach.

Pedro does no favors to the memory of its complex and inspiring subject by reducing Zamora's life to a farrago of sound bites, clichés, and hugs.

  Topics: Reviews , Celebrity News, Entertainment, Pedro,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH