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October lite

By PETER KEOUGH  |  September 17, 2009

Because when everything is said and done, it's all about the director, especially at this time of year, when the gleam of Oscar gold beckons just over the horizon. True, we no longer have Federico Fellini, but we do have Rob Marshall of Chicago fame putting in a solid NINE (November 27), his adaptation of the Broadway musical version of the Italian master's self-reflexive masterpiece 8-1/2. Expect to see cast members Daniel Day Lewis, Marion Cotillard, Penélope Cruz, Judi Dench, and Nicole Kidman back on the red carpet come awards season. Solipsistic, self-reflective, and thoroughly derivative, movies don't get any more escapist than this.

Editor's Note: The movie the Wolfman was listed as coming out on November 6 and has now been changed to opening on February 12, 2010.

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