FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: Disney's A Christmas Carol

State-of-the-art technology allows actors to reach new heights of hamminess
By PETER KEOUGH  |  November 9, 2009
1.5 1.5 Stars

 

Charles Dickens made a mint with readings of A Christmas Carol, but a century and a half of technological progress has not been kind to the property. Thanks to Robert Zemeckis’s state-of-the-art 3-D performance-capture animation, audiences can now enjoy the spectacle of Jacob Marley’s ghost (Gary Oldman) spewing spit in their laps.

Or Bob Cratchit (Oldman again) looking like Gollum in a waistcoat. Or endless sequences of the camera flying over a snow-globe-like London. And there’s something about the process that frees up actors to deliver their hammiest performances, especially Jim Carrey as Scrooge and all three Ghosts.

Man, that Ghost of Christmas Present sure can laugh. Zemeckis does conjure his canny Back to the Future period when he plays games with the notion of time. But the best part of this Christmas Carol is the end, when the ugly animation metamorphoses back into the pages of a book.

  Topics: Reviews , Celebrity News, Entertainment, Movie Stars,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH