FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Review: My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done?

Herzog, Lynch, dwarves, and an ostrich
By PETER KEOUGH  |  March 9, 2010
2.5 2.5 Stars



Not so much Werner Herzog's return to his former persnickety, off-the-wall, idiosyncratic feature-film-making self as a reprise of his greatest hits, the overloaded My Son, My Son staggers and sometimes comes to a complete halt. Or maybe that's the point: from time to time, the characters simply freeze in place.

Is this an allusion to the deadpan weirdness of the producer, David Lynch? Or is it a reminder, along with the dwarf cameo, that Lynch was in fact influenced by Herzog's 1970 film Even Dwarfs Started Small?

Such musings crop up when the narrative — which is based on the true story of an actor who took his role as Orestes home with him and killed his mother — runs a little dry. Willem Dafoe plays a detective who chats with the crazy guy's wife (Chloë Sevigny) and drama teacher (Udo Kier!) while they wait out a hostage crisis. The film can be funny and even epiphanic, but when Brad Dourif and an ostrich doesn't get a laugh, you're trying too hard.

  Topics: Reviews , Entertainment, Entertainment, Orestes,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH