FIND MOVIES
Movie List
Loading ...
or
Find Theaters and Movie Times
or
Search Movies

Heroine chic

By PETER KEOUGH  |  April 12, 2010

Still, it was progress of sorts — or maybe progressive politics. The knee-jerk liberal in me would like to attribute that ’90s boomlet to eight years of a Democratic administration when women’s roles were regarded as less ironclad. And maybe see the present trend as part of the spirit that brought on the election of the first African-American president, not to mention the first directorial Oscar given to a woman — and that for helming a war movie.

Hardly. A quick look at some of the films suggests that Girl Power transcends ideology. As with John Milius’s Red Dawn (1984), in which teenage girls and boys take up arms against Russian invaders; it’s been remade and will be released in November. Or Henry Hathaway’s True Grit (1969), in which a hard-boiled hoyden seeks frontier justice with the help of a down-and-out lawman played by right-wing icon John Wayne; the Coen Brothers are remaking it for Christmas release.

More unsettling is Austrian director Michael Haneke’s The White Ribbon, in which a young girl manipulates her peers into wreaking havoc on a pre–World War I German village — a dress rehearsal for the Third Reich. Sometimes it’s simply the nature of power — whether for girls or boys — to corrupt.

Peter Keough can be reached at pkeough@phx.com.

< prev  1  |  2  |  3  | 
  Topics: Features , Celebrity News, Entertainment, Angelina Jolie,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY PETER KEOUGH
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   BUFFET DINING: THE 15TH BOSTON UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 19, 2013
    "Copraphagy" is a key word at this year's Boston Underground Film Festival at the Brattle.
  •   REVIEW: GINGER & ROSA  |  March 19, 2013
    Sally Potter likes to mess around with form and narrative.
  •   UNDERGROUND CINEMA: THE 12TH BOSTON TURKISH FILM FESTIVAL  |  March 12, 2013
    This year's Boston Turkish Film Festival includes works in which directors ponder the relationships between the secular and the religious, between men and women, and between destiny and identity.
  •   REVIEW: A GLIMPSE INSIDE THE MIND OF CHARLES SWAN III  |  March 12, 2013
    In Roman Coppola's sophomoric second feature (his 2001 debut CQ was promising), Charlie Sheen shows restraint as the titular asshole, a dissolute ad designer and solipsistic whiner who's mooning over the loss of his latest love.
  •   REVIEW: UPSIDE DOWN  |  March 14, 2013
    Had Ed Wood Jr. directed Fritz Lang's Metropolis , he couldn't have achieved the earnest dopiness of Juan Solanas's sci-fi allegory — nor the striking images.

 See all articles by: PETER KEOUGH