"High Wire" is probably the best overall track here, like Madonna's "Ray of Light" and begging for a remix or 50. The opening is infused with pops of chorused voices contrasted with whomp-whomp synths that are a change of pace when paired with a non-4/4 beat. Then the tune builds from verse to pre-chorus to chorus like a step-ladder: "Another night she spent right here drinking/Another lonely thought that she's still thinking."

When the finishing "Tempted" opens like a cut of Erasure's Chorus, there might be some worry Ford can't keep up the energy, but it builds into something pretty damn danceable before all is said and done.

Look, this ain't Bon Iver breaking your heart over and over again, obviously. This music is as ephemeral and plastic as you might imagine. But neither is it a facsimile of club-music past or an attempt to relive the '80s. Ctrl fits rather snugly into the growing musical excess that's becoming the soundtrack to the lives of kids having their first legal drink in the second decade of the 21st century.

And I'm pretty sure you don't have to have a pink mohawk to enjoy it.

Sam Pfeifle can be reached at  sam_pfeifle@yahoo.com.

CTRL | Released by Dean Ford | March 13 |  itsdeanford.com

< prev  1  |  2  | 
  Topics: CD Reviews , Paul McCartney, Dean Ford, Dean Ford,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY SAM PFEIFLE
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   DISCOVERING SHENNA BELLOWS  |  September 01, 2014
    Long walks and straight talk with the Democractic Senate challenger.
  •   PARTLY SUNNY  |  August 31, 2014
    Mike Clouds' new Apollo's Stamina
  •   NEW WORDS, OLD BEATS  |  August 31, 2014
    Whatever the rap equivalent of “she could sing the phone book and I’d dig it” is, that’s Essence for me.  
  •   FIRST SECOND COMING  |  August 22, 2014
    Hey, look, I Discovered a Planet
  •   THE CRUNK WITCH THAT THEY ARE  |  August 14, 2014
    Three albums in, Crunk Witch are now far more than novelty. The all-digital, husband-wife duo of Brandon Miles and Hannah Collen have created enough material at this point to establish a clear method behind what can sometimes seem like madness.  

 See all articles by: SAM PFEIFLE