THEY'RE KIND OF SET IN THE WORLD OF OTHER BOOKS, BUT MODIFIED.

Yeah, yeah! Like a little bit of Bram Stoker with a little bit of Tolkien, mixed with a few other things.

IN THE WORLD OF MUSIC, IT SEEMS LIKE NO ONE REALLY THINKS MUCH ABOUT HOW GREAT MUSIC WILL BE IN THE FUTURE. AND I GUESS THE ONLY EXCEPTIONS TO THAT THAT I CAN THINK OF ARE PEOPLE WHO ARE INTO IMPOSSIBLY SMALL-SCALE MUSICAL WORLDS WHO HARBOR HOPES THAT THIS MUSIC THAT THEY LOVE IS GOING TO, AGAINST ALL ODDS, CONQUER THE BIG EVIL THAT IS MODERN POPULAR MUSIC.

I think that dystopianism has always been part of science fiction, and in the '60s there were lots of anxieties and worries. And the whole nuclear war thing, we had that, and then stuff like J.G. Ballard's disaster novels. And now we have the disaster stuff — and no other images in popular culture of amazing journeys into the universe and humanity, landing on Venus.

DO YOU THINK EVERYTHING IS JUST TOO INDIVIDUALISTIC? BECAUSE I FEEL LIKE IT'S ALL PART OF WHAT WE WERE TALKING ABOUT EARLIER, WHERE NO ONE WANTS TO PARTICIPATE, NOWADAYS, IN A MASS CULTURE.

It does seem that that's waned, yeah. I dunno, it's hard to say, because it's easy to mistake — I spend a lot of time in with music critics, amateur and professional, so it's hard to mistake that for the real world. I'm sure lots of bands and fans fall for that sort of mass experience, everyone becoming one, etc. But there is definitely not a subculture that everyone's getting behind and rallying to. There's definitely something to Internet culture that encourages people to differ, to differentiate themselves from each other. There isn't much cool to be had by agreeing, you individualize yourself by having slightly different opinions from everyone else. I dunno, it's difficult to say! It does feel like, every passing decade, everything's getting more and more fragmented, and scenes become micro-scenes, and they have a smaller and smaller number of people in them and they're over quicker. Like witch house, if that was ever even really a thing.

RIGHT — LIKE THE WAY THAT "SEAPUNK" WAS A JOKE, DARING THE ABOVE-GROUND TO TAKE IT SERIOUSLY ONLY TO GO "HAH, THIS WASN'T REAL — PUNK'D!"

Yeah, I do wonder where it's all going, I must admit. But then again, people do come up with some really cool records, still.

OH SURE — I MEAN, THERE ARE ARGUABLY MORE INDIVIDUAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS THAN EVER BEFORE, MORE AWESOME ALBUMS AND TRACKS, AND IT'S EASIER THAN EVER TO ACCESS THEM.

That's true, yeah — and if anything good happens anywhere in the world, you can hear about it and find it. But you have to sift through quite a lot of pretty good stuff to get to the amazing stuff. And there's this pathetic fatigue that comes with sifting through pretty good stuff to get to the exceptional stuff.

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