Quiet riot

By BOB GULLA  |  January 10, 2007

At Brooklyn Coffee and Tea House (brooklyncoffeetea house.com) you’ll find at least two or three nights of acoustic-type tuneage every week. This Friday, the cozy place welcomes MILES TO MEROE and ERIC FRENCH. Call 401.575.2284. Julian’s on Broadway is also getting in on the act this weekend, with CHRIS DALTRY of th’ Americans playing with JOHN KENNY & MIS ZILL. The free show starts at 10 pm. Call 401.861.1770.

Obviously, with so many venues turning to acoustic music, or unplugged sets, folks are at least coming out to hear live music. Perhaps these audiences are aging and they’ve decided to exchange the customary pint of ale for a mug of herbal tea, and a late starting time for an earlier one. But, hell, it’s a start, and you don’t even need earplugs.

New deal
In keeping with the hope and optimism theme of last week, there is a veteran venue — the Penalty Box, on North Main Street in Providence — seeking talent. Jon Bradner is doing the booking (penaltyboxbooking@yahoo.com). “We’re looking to bring in small acts, drawing 20-60+ people, to perform any night of the week,” he wrote in an e-mail. “We’re answering your call for more live music support in Providence and hope we can increase the turnout.” He says the room is small but useful, the type of place that acts will, for the time being, have to provide their own PA. They’re now accepting submissions for acts to start performing immediately. “I use the term ’venue’ lightly now as we are not established,” writes Bradner, “but hope to change that and make upgrades accordingly.” Another stage is another stage, and local music can sure use all the platforms it can get.

Wandering eye
The TIM TAYLOR BLUES BAND with Marlie Vincent will appear at the News Café in Pawtucket on Friday at 8 pm. If you’re lucky, they’ll have John Packer and Mookie Kane backing them up. Call 401.728.6475.

JOHNNY CARLEVALE AND THE BROKEN RHYTHM BOYS embark on their 2007 gig calendar in style this Saturday at the Century Lounge in a sizzling bill that includes THE TIM HEROUX TRIO, an all-new Providence based burlesque troupe called THE DAZZLING DAMES, and SASQUATCH & THE SICK-A-BILLYS. The 18-plus show starts 9 pm; there’s a $10 cover. Call 401.751.2255. Also on Saturday, the Providence Black Repertory Company will host BUSTED FRO, a New Bedford-based Cape Verdean hip-hop trio founded in 1992. They have opened for big acts like Brand Nubian, Killa Priest, and Dead Prez. The band will play at 10 pm at the Xxodus Café, 276 Westminster Street. Tickets are $10; call 401.351.0353. JERI AND THE JEEPSTERS play the Steel Horse Saloon in Portsmouth on Saturday. Call 401.682.2974. The HIGH ROLLERS have gigs on Friday and Saturday at the Narragansett Café in Jamestown. Call 401.423.2150. On Wednesday (the 17th), Tom Ferraro, Keith Munslow, and Tom Petteruti will brighten the midweek at Nick-a-Nee’s. Call 401.861.7290.

Email the author
Bob Gulla: bobgulla@verizon.net.

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