The dark side of the rainbow

By NICK SYLVESTER  |  August 29, 2007

At the moment, the thrill of so many of these AV mash-ups is the relative incongruity between the audio and video, and the extent to which they are perfectly matched — the extent to which all the noise is eliminated and only the synchronicities remain. Think back to the effort entailed in noting the coincidences between DSotM and The Wizard of Oz. Each work itself is so rich, so complex, that interpretations of their coincidences, however unintended or meaningless, might be made endlessly. The nature of the YouTube remix seems different: an instant pleasure, a one-off gag with a TV-news weatherperson in front of the map singing the words to “It’s Raining Men,” or the synching of Lance Armstrong races to trance music.

Let’s not be too pessimistic. An awe of low-grade synchronicity isn’t a terrible thing for a pop culture to move past, and no creative technology this writer can remember didn’t have a period when its art communicated nothing beyond the technology that produced it. The lunatic is on the grass, but troubles will melt like lemondrops, and so on.

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