Colony collapse disorder

Covered in Bees Kill Louder Than Fire
By SAM PFEIFLE  |  December 5, 2007
insideeat_CoveredInBees1

If you get a chance, check out the trailer for the movie 2 on YouTube. Not only does it feature some ripping Covered in Bees, but it’s just sort of downright wrong in a very entertaining way. If you like zombies eating flesh, this is your flick. And if you like gore, giant gaping wounds, and the like, Covered in Bees are your band. Nobody has more fun with morbidity than the Bees.

On the packaging for Portland Death Punk, Vol. 2: Louder than Fire, a follow-up to their late-2005 debut, you’ll even find the CiB in zombie profile, sores dripping, mouths set in frowns (it’s no fun being undead). Just as you’ll find fine, hard-driving punk celebrations of death throughout the disc’s 13 tracks (psst, one’s secret). Maybe the most disturbing of those is “Spiderlady II: Chest Full of Eggs.” But not because of the poppy-punk “whoa-aha-oah” vocals. Because that’s just grody, isn’t it? A lady, who’s a spider, and has a chest full of eggs? It’s sort of bile-inducing.

“I’m having a hard time breathing, but I think I’m going to be okay,” Boo Leavitt belts out. Yeah, that sums it up for me, too.

Portland Death Punk, Vol. 2: Louder Than Fire | Released by Covered in Bees, on Entertainment Experiment | at the Big Easy, in Portland | with Twisted Roots + Sidecar Radio + Pete Kilpatrick + Highway Jackson + Jeff Beam & Friends + Dominic and the Lucid + Jaye Drew and a Moving Train + Grupo Esperanza + Roy Davis + Meantone + Brzowski + Jake Roche + Cambiata + Headstart! + Cosades | Dec. 14
Never has a living hell sounded so fun (and a little bit silly). The images they call up can be initially distasteful, I’ll admit. But I’m sort of prudish. Most people won’t have any problem immediately reveling in the Bees’ ridiculousness — on “Nightbreed,” not only does Boo offer that, “I’m dressed all in black so you won’t see me stalking/I wear two pairs of socks so you won’t hear me walking,” but the central riff might actually recall Golden Earring’s “Radar Love” on purpose. It’s hard to say.

Part of what makes the band so appealing is their technical skill. Accompanying hardcore punkers, Doug Porter (see also: Confusatron) is a nearly absurdly talented guitar player, and his solos on tunes like “Car on Fire with Guns” and “Welcome to Handgun City” recall everyone from Stevie Ray Vaughn to Tony Iommi. On “Ride with Us,” Porter pairs guitar licks in the left and right channels like trains barreling toward a common exchange in a game of chicken. “If you ride with us,” the band remind you, “you ride with death.” And this is of course introduced by handclaps.

If all of those teen-aimed horror movies (the Saw series, The Hills Have Eyes, etc.) showed one ounce of the cheek Covered in Bees carry off, maybe I wouldn’t find them so repulsive. Are we celebrating death, or are we celebrating life? That might sound all religious-right of me, but when horror is used just for shock and awe, it’s hard to see the point. Shouldn’t we try to have a little fun with our entertainment?

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