It's easy for Portland to get behind an act as well-put-together as Lady Lamb the Beekeeper.

Aly Spaltro takes to a new level a likeable Maurice Sendak aesthetic somewhat common to "indie-rocker scene" — suspenders, knickers, face-paint whiskers, and a quasi-shy attitude. But musically it is as if she seeks to contradict this childish image with insightful songs that share a world vision with the likes of Kimya Dawson. From a narrative standpoint, she seems to encapsulate something nostalgic about young love; she forces us to miss our summer-love melodramas of yesteryear. We — the audience — are easily sold on this mix of visions from our childhood storybooks and remembrances of love when it actually hurt.

It's a simple arrangement. You have the small-framed, cute-faced girl on guitar and vocals, and an eyes-closed, tossed-hair chap keeping the beat on an undersized drum kit. While watching, it's hard to comprehend that so much cuteness has been fit into such a small space. But cuteness and witty lyrics can only go so far. I was left wanting a little more from the set. Surely there is talent there to be expanded upon. Simplicity in the indie-rock genre always risks becoming passé. I think for us all to grow with Lady Lamb, the act will have to eventually move on from that whole beauty-in-simplicity angle and try out bigger and more daring ideas.

myspace.com/LadyLambTheBeekeeper 

  Topics: New England Music News , Kimya Dawson, Maurice Sendak, Empire,  More more >
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ARTICLES BY CHAD CHAMBERLAIN
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