Jolivert says the project "really relates to architecture" because "it's about the experience of being in a space" and exploring the way it looks and feels and how people interact with it.

But it's also one of those rarities in art: something you're supposed to touch, squeeze, climb into. How could you miss out on that?

"Co-Habitation" is on display in the Bayard Ewing Building lobby, 231 South Main Street, Providence, until February 26. There will be a closing reception February 25 as part of RISD's undergraduate open studios.

< prev  1  |  2  | 
  Topics: This Just In , Museums, Rhode Island School of Design, Giles Holt,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY MARION DAVIS
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   SAVOR THESE URBAN (AND SUBURBAN) OASES  |  September 27, 2011
    It's not a huge state, but Rhode Island, you may be realizing, is abuzz with activity. There's music, poetry, theater, gallery shows, social gatherings, and all sorts of events at the colleges.
  •   REWRITING THE HISTORY OF CAPITALISM  |  March 30, 2011
    Brown University president Ruth Simmons has made it hard to ignore the school's ties to slavery — and by extension, the ties of well-known Providence families.
  •   GREENING THE KNOWLEDGE DISTRICT  |  March 09, 2011
    Christopher Bull is on the engineering faculty at Brown University, but what he teaches is a vision. “We all bear some responsibility in the direction the world goes,” he says, “and we need to accept that responsibility and act on it.”
  •   CATAPULTER WANTS YOU TO TRAVEL SMARTER  |  February 23, 2011
    You’re headed to New York and you need to keep the trip as cheap as possible, but also want WiFi, so you can work. Or perhaps you’re due in Boston’s Back Bay area, ASAP, and you need the ride to be quick and direct, even if it costs a little extra.
  •   AT RISD: 2X4S, TAPE, AND 'CO-HABITATION'  |  February 09, 2011
    In photographs, it looks like a giant spider web. But up close, it's shiny and transparent under the golden light. It's big enough for a person to climb into and crawl through — or you can poke your head in from a hole underneath or on the sides.

 See all articles by: MARION DAVIS