That means medical-marijuana users shouldn't get too comfortable: "Patients need to be on guard, so the law doesn't get too restrictive," Crawford says.

In fact, one of the little-noticed effects of the new medical-marijuana law is that it actually makes some penalties tougher for dealers. Once the DPH gets dispensaries up and running, the new law declares that if "fraudulent use [of your registration card] is for the distribution, sale, or trafficking of marijuana for non-medical use for profit it shall be a felony punishable by up to 5 years in state prison or up to two and one half years in the house of correction."

That's more time than the current state law on distribution.

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