Iraq: Five years later

By PETER KADZIS  |  March 12, 2008

Or another way of putting it is this: is securing this little piece of land — and when you look at it from a global perspective, Iraq is not a very big place — worth it? Given all the instabilities in all the other places in the world, such as Afghanistan and Pakistan, is this the best way, the best place to invest another $1.2 trillion? Will enhancing Iraq make America any safer? That, after all, is what any presidential candidate ought to be addressing.

Is there a way to calculate how much this war costs the average american family each day? Or week? Or month? Or year?
Think about it this way: the war has cost each American family about $30,000. That’s more money than some families make in a year. For others, it might not bankrupt them, but it could sure make a difference. It’s about the price of a new car — whether you wanted to buy the car or not.

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