Workin' man blues

By AL DIAMON  |  March 8, 2010

And where did the GOP find these swell candidates? At a matchmaking Web site called e-Political Harmony.com? Don't be silly. They got them from the working class.

"You know what?" Webster told the Bangor Republican City Committee last year, according to the Bangor Daily News. "Once we convince that group of people that we're the party that represents them, we're gonna win because you know what? In the end, we are the party that represents the working people."

So who does the GOP have running for the Legislature this year to represent the great unwashed?

There's Michael Povich of Ellsworth, who labored away for decades as the district attorney for Washington and Hancock counties, where his primary interaction with the working class was putting its members in jail.

There's Paul Waterhouse of Bridgton, who forged his proletariat credentials in his former role as a four-term state representative who consistently opposed raising the minimum wage.

And there's state Senate candidate Tom Saviello of Wilton, who's currently a state representative and who works in a paper mill. In a management capacity.

You can smell the sweat.

It's difficult to believe Republicans won't gain seats in the Legislature this year, given the economy, the political climate, and the number of incumbent Democrats who have tenuous holds on districts that lean to the GOP. But the pachyderm party has had similar advantages in the past, only to sink faster than a Hawaiian resort's submarine during a lard-eaters convention.

Charlie Webster should lose that tropical tan and start looking pale and scared.

Win tickets to see The Daily Show. But not by e-mailing me at aldiamon@herniahill.net.

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