NHTP’s wistful Godot

By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  November 20, 2012

They bring the comedy down beautifully for the lovely, haunting little dialogue about hearing "all the dead voices" making sounds "like feathers" and "like leaves," one of the quieter and more searching moments. I'd like to see earlier and deeper seeds of the desperation growing in Didi: for example, there might be more of a pang in his voice during what otherwise seems the mere conversational boredom of imploring Gogo to "say anything at all;" or he might bring his befuddled rhetoric about man's plight to a higher pitch before it collapses into the agonized confusion of "What have I said?"

But his existential alarm is achingly evident in the second act, and his and Gogo's petulant camaraderie is all the more affecting against that presence, as it should be, in the New Hampshire Theatre Project's wistful rendition of Beckett's classic.

WAITING FOR GODOT | by Samuel Beckett | Directed by Genevieve Aichele | Produced by the New Hampshire Theatre Project, in Portsmouth | through November 25 | 603.431.6644

< prev  1  |  2  | 
  Topics: Theater , Blair Hundertmark, New Hampshire Theatre Project, Peter Motson,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY MEGAN GRUMBLING
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM  |  April 17, 2014
    Snowlion gets dark with a musical tragedy
  •   THE HYDROPHILIC LIFE  |  April 11, 2014
    The very winning world premiere of Underwaterguy , which Underwood both wrote and performs, runs now at Good Theater, under the direction of Cheryl King.
  •   THE PASSIONS OF PRIVATE LIVES  |  April 03, 2014
    Battle of the exes at Portland Players
  •   LEARNING TO HEAR, AND LISTEN  |  April 03, 2014
    The vicissitudes of identity and community are difficult negotiations in Nina Raine’s drama Tribes , dynamically directed by Christopher Grabowski for Portland Stage Company.
  •   THE DEAD DON'T LEAVE  |  March 28, 2014
    The complexity of familial love, regret, and shame, as seen between Charlie, who long ago moved to London, and his simple, sometimes confounding, working-class gardener father (Tony Reilly), are the crucible of Hugh Leonard’s Da .

 See all articles by: MEGAN GRUMBLING