Review: El Tapatio

By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  January 3, 2012

Previously I had enjoyed their Mexican trio ($18.95), which had carne asada steak, shrimp, and charbroiled chicken, but my appetite was more modest. Good, because my puerco adovado ($14.25) was exquisite. The pounded, marinated, and grilled pork loin pieces were tangy and tender, accompanied by a cabbage slaw and long grain rice, plus a scoop of guacamole, with cilantro and raw onion on the side. Happy choice.

The desserts include sopapillas ($3.95), fried and honeyed tortillas sprinkled with cinnamon sugar; and chimichangas manzana ($4.95), fried tortilla filled with spiced apple slices, served with vanilla ice cream. We made the mistake of ordering the flan ($4.50), and the egg custard was so pasty from thickener that neither of us took more than a couple of bites. A shame, considering how enjoyable all the rest had been.

Yet all in all the dining experience was well worthwhile. If we hadn't been transported to Mexico, at least we'd been taken to some border town close by.

El Tapatio | 401.295.2280 | 8220 Post Rd, North Kingstown | Sun-Thurs, 11 am-10 pm; Fri-Sat, 11 am-11 pm | Major Credit Cards | Full Bar | Sidewalk-Level Accessible

< prev  1  |  2  | 
  Topics: Restaurant Reviews , Mexico, Texas, food,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY BILL RODRIGUEZ
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   TWOTENOYSTER BAR & GRILL  |  July 23, 2014
    One of the appealing features of living in a place called the Ocean State is that there are plenty of water-view restaurants.
  •   BEE'S THAI CUISINE  |  July 16, 2014
    On the radar of Providence foodies, the ding of Bee’s Thai Cuisine has grown increasingly louder and brighter.
  •   THE FINAL COUNTDOWN  |  July 16, 2014
    Strap in for a fast-paced adaptation of Agatha Christie's classic mystery.
  •   A SO-SO SATIRE  |  July 02, 2014
    There’s this poor country whose medium of exchange is goats (actually, promises of parts of a goat — promissory goats).
  •   PROFOUNDLY SILLY  |  June 25, 2014
    It’s been more than a half-century since Eugène Ionesco’s first play, The Bald Soprano , was written in a burst of splenetic post-WWII exasperation over the ludicrous behavior of his species.

 See all articles by: BILL RODRIGUEZ