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Boy Culture

G&LF/VF opener traditionally vapid
By PETER KEOUGH  |  May 5, 2006
1.5 1.5 Stars

Boy Culture
Boy Culture

Once again the Gay & Lesbian Film/Video Festival starts off on a note of stultifying superficiality. The men’s opening-night entry is a traditional vapid romantic comedy. Q. Allan Brocka follows up his sub-TV debut sit-com and 2004 G&LF/VF opener, Eating Out, with this marginally better morality tale about “X” (Derek Magyar), a Seattle male prostitute in search of true love. I mean, besides himself, though it’s really a love-hate relationship, as the coy, wall-to-wall clichés of his voiceover narration make clear. Maybe he’ll find it with his African-American roommate, Andrew, or with Gregory, a seventysomething client played by the great character actor Patrick Bauchau. But even Bauchau’s skill falters in the face of lines like “Love is about taking a chance, it isn’t a transaction.” “X” sums it up better when he describes the scenario as “like a bad porno movie, without the sex.”
  Topics: Reviews , Q. Allan Brocka
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