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MONEYBALL

Adapting Michael Lewis's bestseller of the same title, director Bennett Miller takes up the story of Oakland A's GM Billy Beane, whose cutthroat statistical approach to team building won pennants and revolutionized baseball. It's the classic underdog tale by way of a buddy movie, combining Major League with the revenge-of-the-nerds dynamic and barbed dialogue of The Social Network (the latter, like Moneyball, co-scripted by Aaron Sorkin). Pitt brings nuance to the role of Beane, and Jonah Hill puts in his best performance as Beane's bean-counting assistant in a rich celebration of the national pastime that is also a microcosm of how America works.

READ the full review here.

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