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Call Me Kuchu, screening Sunday, is a more sobering affair. Katherine Fairfax Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall’s film results from a year spent with a small community of LGBT activists in Kenya that ends in unexpected tragedy. The political mood is volatile — thanks to religious figures, pending anti-gay legislation, and the stunning tabloid tactics of a paper called Rolling Stone — but the film’s activists carry on with calm persistence in their public and private lives. That may sound dry, but Call Me Kuchu quickly, ineffably connects viewer and subject: we constantly watch characters cook, eat, and harvest food, and those elemental activities — acts of survival — gracefully invite us into their private lives as we learn of their social goals.

Human Rights Film Series | Nov 15-17 | films screen at 7:30 pm at SPACE Gallery | $8, students $6 | space538.org

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ARTICLES BY CHRISTOPHER GRAY
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