Rattle them Bones

By SAM PFEIFLE  |  May 2, 2012

Probably the most pure pop tune here is the finishing "In Out Over," which features especially tight backing-vocal samples, punctuations of "tell me how you're feelin' now," like old-school Beyoncé. In the chorus, this driving force is underlined by a languid guitar picking out single notes while the rest of the song is in full-on rave-up, putting a bit of a governor on the energy but making this much more interesting than your average dance-pop fare. The song gets dark still later, with Vaderish synths and a fairly heavy electric guitar that's mixed to the back a bit to keep things from getting too grungy.

"Think I'm gonna lose it!," Allen nearly screams, but that's hard to believe. This five-song introduction is so nicely orchestrated and constructed that the Other Bones seem like they're just about always in control.

HINGES | Released by the Other Bones | with Ginlab + Rotating Taps + DJ Brotown | at Slainte, in Portland | May 5 | theotherbones.com

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