I’m confident he chose the Anna Lombard collaboration with Rustic Overtones, “The Stranger,” because it will instantly transport you into a Breakfast at Tiffany’s dream state you won’t want to exit. Holy wow. And Sara Cox’s “Glory” because she can still just absolutely kick you right in the heart.

There will likely be introductions here, too, for even the most devout local fans. Whale Oil might be a revelation, with a 1990s-Northampton sound, a sneaky-good mid-song instrumental break in “Towards the End,” which is the song you’re most likely to need to hear again immediately. Hopefully you’re not sleeping on Post Provost, but “Didn’t Mean to Love Her” will wake you up regardless, like the Killers covering a Beatles tune.

Charlie Schmidt, hailing from Hallowell’s musical enclave, turns in a Garcia-Grisman kind of thing with “Virginia.” Serious Rooms picks up the Frotus Caper’s British Invasion thread with “The Answers.” Michael O, part of Portland’s musical diaspora, proves he’s an artful vocalist with the delicate and piano-driven “Breakdown.”

Fellow Diasporian Slaid Cleaves is a familiar voice, though, and those who quickly grabbed his latest Still Fighting the War and were charmed by “Whim of Iron,” inspired by the St. Lawrence Arts Center’s Deirdre Nice, will appreciate the live version here.

Because that’s what this is for, after all. Proceeds from these GFAC discs still go to renovate the St. Lawrence Arts Center, the little performance space that could on the top of Munjoy Hill . . . which also doesn’t have any local shows this month. Except for David Mallett on November 29 — I guess the boys’ father still counts.

The GFAC series still counts, too, and maybe it will give local songwriters the goose they need.

Greetings from Area Code 207 | Released by Cornmeal Records | cornmealrecords.com

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