Smart acting

By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  June 24, 2010

Simon does get a few charming lines in — Sophia's favorite color is yellow, she says, because "it doesn't stick to your fingers as much" — and he occasionally touches on ideas with possible heft: Nikolai and Lenya excitedly plead for Leon to ask them "the question" ("What is the purpose of man's existence?") because it makes them "feel important." Some funny ironies also surface in the fates of the townspeople after the curse is lifted. But what Simon might have crafted as more incisive comedy merely grazes the surface.

That said, this cast and crew deserves props for making such a vivacious production of his script. I look forward to seeing the talents of these thespians at work in a future play, preferably one written with somewhat nobler intentions.

Megan Grumbling can be reached atmgrumbling@hotmail.com.

FOOLS by Neil Simon | Directed by Celeste Green | Produced by Lyric Music Theater, in South Portland | through June 27 | 207.799.1421

< prev  1  |  2  | 
  Topics: Theater , Entertainment, Performing Arts, Theater,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY MEGAN GRUMBLING
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM  |  April 17, 2014
    Snowlion gets dark with a musical tragedy
  •   THE HYDROPHILIC LIFE  |  April 11, 2014
    The very winning world premiere of Underwaterguy , which Underwood both wrote and performs, runs now at Good Theater, under the direction of Cheryl King.
  •   THE PASSIONS OF PRIVATE LIVES  |  April 03, 2014
    Battle of the exes at Portland Players
  •   LEARNING TO HEAR, AND LISTEN  |  April 03, 2014
    The vicissitudes of identity and community are difficult negotiations in Nina Raine’s drama Tribes , dynamically directed by Christopher Grabowski for Portland Stage Company.
  •   THE DEAD DON'T LEAVE  |  March 28, 2014
    The complexity of familial love, regret, and shame, as seen between Charlie, who long ago moved to London, and his simple, sometimes confounding, working-class gardener father (Tony Reilly), are the crucible of Hugh Leonard’s Da .

 See all articles by: MEGAN GRUMBLING