The performances are superb, pulling us fully into fascinating states of mind. Estrella has the blackmailing Krogstad feeling pulled apart, for survival needing to game the social system, yet desperately wanting to feel honorable. Speaking of desperation, Torvald and Nora get lengthy monologues at the conclusion that explain their conflicting worldviews with crystal clarity. Kidd and Kane do wonders inhabiting the characters. We completely understand how a powerful businessman could see that his reputation is more important than his foolish wife. We see perfectly how a foolish wife, transformed from a giddy ditz, can finally apprehend the surreality of her life and the need to walk away from it and begin anew.

Get to the Gamm box office now, and get tickets for your children, for the postman, for your neighbors. The more Nora Helmers we encourage to leave dishonest lives, the fewer Hedda Gablers we'll have committing suicide.

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