Not the Bard at his best - the similar but simpler Winter's Tale works better. ASP squeezes the play into a reasonable two and a half hours (one intermission) by jettisoning the soothsayer and Posthumus's dream masque about his family (with the special cameo appearance by Jupiter) and making sensible cuts. Seven actors, all in white tops and trousers, zip about the carpeted performance space in stockinged or bare feet, sitting to the side and playing imaginatively deployed percussion instruments (including slide whistle) when not on stage. But characterization is also pared down, with Brooke Hardman a floppy, puppyish Innogen, De'Lon Grant an earnest Posthumus and a vainglorious Cloten (that's right, they're never on at the same time), Ken Baltin a blustering Cymbeline, Marya Lowry a vampy queen, and Risher Reddick a Pisanio who's not so different from his Arviragas. It's a little like watching Friends do Shakespeare; all the actorly histrionics give the play's pageantry and majesty short shrift. The Bard has seen much worse, of course. And if you want to see Cymbeline, time is not on your side.

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Related: Review: Johnny English Reborn, Review: Anonymous, Les Misérables leads the charge at PPAC, More more >
  Topics: Theater , Doug Lockwood, Marya Lowry, Celtic,  More more >
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