Playwright Ruhl bravely has a man be the strongest feminist of the play, though it is inevitable that he would be the most liberated, intellectually and thereby sexually. (He says that if he had loved fewer women he would be an illustrator; more, and he would be a poet.) Kneeland's intelligent enthusiasm makes Leo a fascinating contrast to these other stifled characters. The heart of this play is Sherba showing us Mrs. Givings bursting with youthful frustration and Morris exemplifying the loving but misdirected Mr. Givings. Yet Kneeland's unfettered but other-directed artist is its soul.

It's small wonder that this play was a 2010 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. A graduate of Paula Vogel's MFA playwriting program at Brown, Ruhl accomplishes far more in this, her 10th produced play, than in the well-received but inconsequential Dead Man's Cell Phone two years earlier. Fast-paced historical, sociological, and sexual observations — a very funny trifecta.

< prev  1  |  2  | 
  Topics: Theater , Theater, Theatre, Sarah Ruhl,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY BILL RODRIGUEZ
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   TWOTENOYSTER BAR & GRILL  |  July 23, 2014
    One of the appealing features of living in a place called the Ocean State is that there are plenty of water-view restaurants.
  •   BEE'S THAI CUISINE  |  July 16, 2014
    On the radar of Providence foodies, the ding of Bee’s Thai Cuisine has grown increasingly louder and brighter.
  •   THE FINAL COUNTDOWN  |  July 16, 2014
    Strap in for a fast-paced adaptation of Agatha Christie's classic mystery.
  •   A SO-SO SATIRE  |  July 02, 2014
    There’s this poor country whose medium of exchange is goats (actually, promises of parts of a goat — promissory goats).
  •   PROFOUNDLY SILLY  |  June 25, 2014
    It’s been more than a half-century since Eugène Ionesco’s first play, The Bald Soprano , was written in a burst of splenetic post-WWII exasperation over the ludicrous behavior of his species.

 See all articles by: BILL RODRIGUEZ