Uncle Eugene is fully supportive and backs Arthur's yearning for tradition, so much so that he assembles everyone to take the annual family picture though he knows that the camera on the tripod is broken. "Right now we've got to concentrate on form," he says. "Content will come later."

Everyone performs ably here, especially Austin as a commanding presence as Arthur. Coughlin and Davis are in delightful competition as the physically ludicrous mother and grandmother. Gozansky's direction is imaginative, with daringly lengthy pauses here and there that work well comically.

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  Topics: Theater , tango, Trinity Repertory Company, MFA
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