Over the past few years, Boston's Cristi Rinklin has been making some of the best paintings in the region — mating the looks of digital graphics and heroic 19th century Hudson River School landscapes into freeform postmodern visions. The payoff is Diluvial, a 20-some-foot-wide cartoon inspired by New Hampshire's White Mountains of floating green clouds stretching like taffy, stark mountains, and swooping blue waterfalls and rivers. Rinklin made several paintings, joined them together via Photoshop, printed it out, and pasted it over windows at the Currier Museum of Art (150 Ash St, Manchester, New Hampshire, through September 9). Sun glows through it like stained-glass in a soothing, breathtaking cathedral.

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Related: SLIDESHOW: ''Marsden Hartley: Soliloquy in Dogtown'' + Cristi Rinklin's ''Diluvial'', SPACE to screen video banned from Smithsonian, Review: ''Remember the Ladies'' at the Newport Art Museum, More more >
  Topics: Museum And Gallery , Gloucester, Cristi Rinklin, Marsden Hartley,  More more >
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