When I watch Showgirls, I think you’re having a great time — as if you’re acting in a different movie. I wish I could’ve seen the version of Showgirls that you’re acting in. Rather than the version that actually exists. Yeah, I’ve heard that before. Listen, Showgirls, to me, it’s a lesson in hypocrisy. As far as critics who just ripped it to shreds when it came out, and those same critics and journalists are still asking me about it today, 20 years later or however long it is. It was so fucking in fashion to say how bad it was, and now people have turned it into a cult classic. If people didn’t like it so much, why are they constantly asking me about it all the time? I find it kind of funny. It might have turned campy at moments, but at the end of the day, Paul Verhoeven is a good filmmaker. I thought the movie was going to be a little different than how it was at the very end, but you can’t worry about what people think. If I really hate a movie, I will turn it off in the middle, or I won’t turn it on again.

How do you feel about the fact that given the material in Killer Joe, you’re automatically looking at a limited audience? When you do something like that, or Prey for Rock & Roll, which also didn’t get a major release, is it frustrating to do good work and not have it be seen? Friedkin always knew Killer Joe was going to be NC-17. And he deserves to make whatever film he wants. He wanted to stay true to the script, and he wanted to go for it. He made no bones about it. Actually, I’m not sure, I thought it could be R-rated. But, I thought, “William Friedkin. Tracy Letts. This cast, this part. I’ll do it.” It’s a little bit frustrating, but it’s the nature of the beast with NC-17.

In the case of Prey For Rock and Roll, that was just a classic, tragic, sad case of the distributor not knowing and not caring how to release it. I was on the middle of a tour promoting it, and all of a sudden I found out it wasn’t in the theaters. They just wimped out. When it came out, it got really good reviews, but then it was gone and no one could find it.

It’s frustrating for so many independent films, because that’s what happens to them. I wish more people had seen that. That was the case with Bound too. It was marketed as kind of this weird lesbian movie, but it shouldn’t have been marketed that way. That left the theaters way too soon. It was people like Liz Smith and the critics saying “What happened to this movie? This is one of the best movies of this year.” And because of that people got it as [video] screeners, which unfortunately is the way a lot of people these days see movies.

The early days of being an actor must be impossible. The odds against success seem staggering. Yeah, you just want the opportunity to work. I was in the beginning of starting a theater company, Naked Angels, and we were happy to do plays and work all day and play baseball at night. I was happy when I got to act. If you go into it thinking about success and money, you’re in for a difficult time.

< prev  1  |  2  |  3  |   next >
Related: Tana French’s murder scenes, Errol Morris: The truth, the whole truth, nothing but the truth, Brilliant friends: Great reads of 2012, More more >
  Topics: Books , Books, Gina Gershon, Interviews,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY ROB TURBOVSKY
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   INTERVIEW: GINA GERSHON FINDS HER PUSSY  |  October 12, 2012
    Even before her traumatically hilarious performance in the trailer-park comedy of horrors Killer Joe , Gina Gershon has been an actor who fiercely commits.
  •   INTERVIEW: LAUREN GREENFIELD LOOKS AT THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES  |  July 25, 2012
    The Queen of Versailles ought to start with a disclaimer: "WARNING: This film may test your ability to laugh at the misfortune of assholes."
  •   INTERVIEW: JOHN WATERS SHOWS YOU HOW TO SURVIVE THE HOLIDAYS  |  December 08, 2011
    John Waters earned his lifetime 99-percenter cred the moment he had Divine eat dog shit in Pink Flamingos .
  •   INTERVIEW: THE WORLD OF STEPHEN TOBOLOWSKY  |  October 27, 2011
    Stephen Tobolowsky has had hundreds of character parts in movies and television shows, in everything from Deadwood to Glee, but with a single "Bing!" and then many more exclamations of it, he turned a small role in Groundhog Day into a permanent staple of the cultural consciousness.
  •   CRISPIN GLOVER BRINGS HIS 'BIG SLIDE SHOW' TO TOWN  |  September 07, 2011
    Crispin Glover made a calling out of being the weirdly jittery guy in big, loud movies like Back to the Future and Hot Tub Time Machine . But it's what he did with that career that's bringing him to Boston.

 See all articles by: ROB TURBOVSKY