Badger, Irons, and Weisenburger engage in a cultural expression of simultaneity by occupying more than one position. While displaying an honest affinity toward and appreciation of nature and its representation, they also take good-natured stabs at it. Highlighting the artifice of landscape painting, they move beyond any experience of it as a restrictive practice, irreverently and intelligently updating it in the process. Their work wittily proposes that contemporary art does not have to choose.

"THE NEW LANDSCAPE: LYDIA BADGER, HILARY IRONS, ERIK WEISENBURGER" | through April 20 | at Rose Contemporary, 492 Congress St, Portland | 207. 780.0700 | rosecontemporary.com

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  Topics: Museum And Gallery , Hilary Irons, Lydia Badger
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