The Epic troupe gives their all and each actor has a fine moment or few, but this bare-bones Alice is too much for them to handle because there is so little to hang onto. Sometimes we're confused about exactly what character an actor has shifted into, because the text doesn't provide prompt identification.

As much as some theater pieces are advantaged by a bare set in a black box, forcing us to imagine, Alice is not such a play. This version is more of a metaphor than a story. As such, if we're not getting a Red Queen bedecked in playing cards, for example, we need to see her regally transformed in some other fashion. (The need for visual cues to engage us is acknowledged here by the Mad Hatter wearing a folded newspaper hat.)

It doesn't denigrate a good actor to say that a particular play needs great actors, to make each character larger than life, to let us see the ordinary through a magnifying glass. Nice try, Epic. It's just that personal best doesn't necessarily win the race.

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