Mad tea party

By MEGAN GRUMBLING  |  April 23, 2008

The story also includes one character, Jason, who’s related to these folks by neither blood nor marriage: He (Jesse Leighton) was the young driver who hit Danny. He re-enters their life against their will, with a goodwill that’s rather blank and other-worldly. Indeed, the kid writes science fiction, and it’s from one of his short stories — a tale of searching through parallel universes down in tunnels — that this play takes its name. Jason’s presence helps highlight the ways in which Becca and Howie, themselves, seek and hide from each other. There is, finally, hope to be found in each other’s desperate outlets — even in chocolate tortes and lemon squares — once they know where to look.

Megan Grumbling can be reached at mgrumbling@hotmail.com.

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