New blood

By CAROLYN CLAY  |  September 10, 2008

But don’t expect the Huntington to turn into some hotbed of the avant-garde. “I feel like I really am standing on Nicky Martin’s shoulders,” says DuBois. “I’m not taking the theater in a radically different direction. We probably think about theater differently, because we grew up during different times. I get very inspired by the notion of connoisseurship, of people developing the same kind of passion for theater that they have for food. I’m a big fan of Barbara Lynch’s restaurants, and I love the way you come in and you know exactly where your ingredients come from. You’re watching the chef cook the meal. And I’m very interested in giving people insight into the theater-making process. We’ve already got a blog going, but we’re starting podcasts with the artists, so that audience members can learn about what’s going into the projects before they come through the doors.”

An unabashed “lover of language,” DuBois is probably more text-oriented than Paulus. He plans to expand the new-play-development program, already a strong arm of the Huntington, which every two years commissions four Playwriting Fellows and each spring presents a festival of new plays. “Our Breaking Ground festival is really starting to take off and develop an audience,” says DuBois. In the future, however, the five-play showdown will have what you might call a winner: one dramatist who gets a working Provincetown vacation complete with director, actors, and designers, as well as a firm commitment that the Huntington will then produce the work. “The great thing about that,” adds DuBois, “is that, when we head into rehearsals, we know we’ve got not only a better script but a community built around the play.”

Like Martin did before him, DuBois comes to his post with a bulging Rolodex. As associate producer at the Public, he oversaw all international collaborations. “So there’s relationships I developed at London’s Royal Court and at the Donmar Warehouse and at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin,” he says. He’s excited by the notion of company residencies and mentions New York–based LAByrinth Theater Company, whose co–artistic director, Oscar-winner Philip Seymour Hoffman, he directed in Jack Goes Boating at the Public. He plans to bring more music and stand-up to the Huntington Presents series, and in January to turn the Deane Rehearsal Hall at the Calderwood into a cabaret. “I feel like I take a very eclectic approach to what theater can and should be,” DuBois says. “I also think I’m an ambitious guy, and I have strong ambitions for this theater."

It’s an ambition that extends across the water. Though you might think of DuBois and Paulus as friendly competitors, they act like two kids eyeing the sandbox that is the local Rialto. “Diane and I are committed to making Boston the hot scene in the country for artists to come to,” says DuBois. “I think we have missions that are different but complementary.” Eustis agrees. “Diane,” he says, “has one of the most fierce minds I’ve encountered in the American theater, and Peter has one of the greatest hearts and spirits. That these two together are taking on theater in Boston is very exciting.”

Carolyn Clay is the Phoenix’s theater critic. She can be reached atcclay@phx.com.

< prev  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  | 
Related: Autumn garden, 2009: The year in theater, Disco ball, More more >
  Topics: Theater , Entertainment, Music, Peter DuBois,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY CAROLYN CLAY
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   ARTSEMERSON'S METAMORPHOSIS  |  February 28, 2013
    Gisli Örn Garðarsson’s Gregor Samsa is the best-looking bug you will ever see — more likely to give you goosebumps than make your skin crawl.
  •   CLEARING THE AIR WITH STRONG LUNGS AT NEW REP  |  February 27, 2013
    Lungs may not take your breath away, but it's an intelligent juggernaut of a comedy about sex, trust, and just how many people ought to be allowed to blow carbon into Earth's moribund atmosphere.
  •   MORMONS, MURDERERS, AND MARINERS: 10 THEATER SENSATIONS COMING TO BOSTON STAGES THIS SPRING  |  February 28, 2013
    Mitt Romney did his Mormon mission in France. But there are no baguettes or croissants to dip into the lukewarm proselytizing of bumbling elders Price and Cunningham, two young men sent by the Church of Latter-day Saints to convert the unfaithful of a Ugandan backwater in The Book of Mormon .
  •   THE HUMAN STAIN: LIFE AND DEATH IN MIDDLETOWN  |  February 22, 2013
    The New York Times dubbed Will Eno a “Samuel Beckett for the Jon Stewart generation.”
  •   ZEITGEIST STAGE COMPANY'S LIFE OF RILEY  |  February 22, 2013
    Sir Alan Ayckbourn has written more than 70 plays, most of which turn on an intricate trick of chronology or geography.

 See all articles by: CAROLYN CLAY