Present laughter

By CAROLYN CLAY  |  February 10, 2010

The slim, open-faced, androgynous Cherie Corinne Rice plays both the disguised Viola, neat in short curls and striped livery, and Viola's twin brother, Sebastian, who despite being believed drowned washes up on Illyrian shores to precipitate a stack-up of mistaken identity. A cool, cocky Sebastian in seaman's sweater and cap, Rice is a natural yet well-spoken Viola, both amused by and trying to stay out of the confusion of which she is the center. She even handles with dexterity the final scene (in which the two characters finally appear together), morphing between siblings by opening a few buttons or donning the cap. Still, the lack of two twins does take away from the tenderness of the pair's reunion.

Only Joe Wilson Jr., a sonorous storm cloud of an Orsino whose sharp diction is not enough to pierce his self-indulgent suffering, seems blind to the broad-comic lightness of the proceedings. Perhaps he's on a one-man mission to supply the absent ache. But the usually excellent actor's Orsino is more smoldering sulk bucket than melancholy swain.

< prev  1  |  2  | 
  Topics: Theater , Entertainment, Entertainment, Lifestyle,  More more >
| More


Most Popular
ARTICLES BY CAROLYN CLAY
Share this entry with Delicious
  •   ARTSEMERSON'S METAMORPHOSIS  |  February 28, 2013
    Gisli Örn Garðarsson’s Gregor Samsa is the best-looking bug you will ever see — more likely to give you goosebumps than make your skin crawl.
  •   CLEARING THE AIR WITH STRONG LUNGS AT NEW REP  |  February 27, 2013
    Lungs may not take your breath away, but it's an intelligent juggernaut of a comedy about sex, trust, and just how many people ought to be allowed to blow carbon into Earth's moribund atmosphere.
  •   MORMONS, MURDERERS, AND MARINERS: 10 THEATER SENSATIONS COMING TO BOSTON STAGES THIS SPRING  |  February 28, 2013
    Mitt Romney did his Mormon mission in France. But there are no baguettes or croissants to dip into the lukewarm proselytizing of bumbling elders Price and Cunningham, two young men sent by the Church of Latter-day Saints to convert the unfaithful of a Ugandan backwater in The Book of Mormon .
  •   THE HUMAN STAIN: LIFE AND DEATH IN MIDDLETOWN  |  February 22, 2013
    The New York Times dubbed Will Eno a “Samuel Beckett for the Jon Stewart generation.”
  •   ZEITGEIST STAGE COMPANY'S LIFE OF RILEY  |  February 22, 2013
    Sir Alan Ayckbourn has written more than 70 plays, most of which turn on an intricate trick of chronology or geography.

 See all articles by: CAROLYN CLAY