Savor the flavor

By JOSH SMITH  |  May 5, 2010

FINALLY, DON’T FREEZE YOUR BEER. All too often, bars will serve beer at subarctic temperatures, numbing the aroma and taste of any beer with even the slightest complexity. The basic rule here is simple: the higher the alcohol content, the warmer the beer should be served. Light beers should be served in the 40sºF and stronger beers in the 50sºF. I chill most dark beers for a matter of minutes, not hours.

Scenario #2: A prominent local restaurant and pub chain brings your imperial stout in a near icy state. This time, try not to freak out. Instead, warm the beer in a glass with your hands . . . and take it as an opportunity to savor your beer.

There may be growing pains at first for those of you who have become accustomed to the frosty temperatures found seemingly everywhere outside of England. Give it a try, though; there is definitely something we can learn from those Brits. Cheers!

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