Review: Hot Suppa

By BRIAN DUFF  |  February 16, 2011

While you can stick to Southern classics, there are also a few quirkier entrées like chicken and waffles, which looked pretty gorgeous as it slipped past our booth, and a poutine served with big slices of grilled foie gras. Hot Suppa's much praised cubano sandwich is also available at dinner, along with a new selection of New Orleans-style po' boys. Hot Suppa now has a full bar, some good beers on tap, and some nice wines at a very reasonable $22.

We should all try to transition to evenings as elegantly as Hot Suppa. Its so tempting in the winter to drive home, put on your fleece pants, and just let yourself sink into oblivion for the night. But our evening selves could be, should be, a sublimated version of our daily utilitarian character — with our most notable qualities refined and concentrated until we are a recognizable but more charming and striking version of ourselves. In this Hot Suppa's new dinner service can serve as both an example, and a reason to leave the house.

Brian Duff can be reached at bduff@une.edu.

DINNER AT HOT SUPPA | 703 Congress St, Portland | Tues-Sat 5-9:15 pm (also breakfast daily 7 am-2 pm) | VISA/MC/Amex/Disc | 207.871.5005

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