Review: Stone Bridge

By BILL RODRIGUEZ  |  June 21, 2011

Across the table from me was another on-the-money dish, rack of lamb ($23.95). The six juicy ribs, cracked-pepper-encrusted, were served in three slices, grilled medium rare as requested, in a pool of their juices. The sides were also enjoyed: beets and potato pancakes that were thin enough to maximize crusted surface but thick enough to stay moist inside. The smart little decisions were adding up.

There are nine desserts listed every day, $4.99 to $7.99 (except the $2.25 baklava). The tiramisu and crème brulée are de rigueur, the bananas foster and peach melba with ice cream are faves, and the Bavarian shortcake, triple chocolate cake, and rice pudding are made there. A kitchen-made bread pudding special was also available and soon set before us: a tasty, dense rectangle accompanied by whipped cream and a scoop of vanilla ice cream, both drizzled with chocolate syrup, like bribes to mollify us if we were disappointed with the star of the plate (we weren't).

Stone Bridge — a much more eventful landmark than the nearby bridge itself.

Bill Rodriguez can be reached at  bill@billrod.com.

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