What will 2013 mean for the food scene?

The Food Forecast:
By CASSANDRA LANDRY  |  December 21, 2012

davebecker2
Dave Becker, Sweet Basil

THE HOT TREND
"I think that grains other than corn and wheat are going to be common. Grains that have been malted, toasted, or sprouted give depth without the usual tools — quinoa, teff, and millet. Also, seaweed. Most of it is edible, flavorful, and sometimes it is even invasive. It would be cool for chefs to create a demand for it."

THE CULINARY CONTROVERSY
"I think climate change and the way it affects crop growth will rise to the forefront next year. For instance, I think the droughts happening in the Midwest and the inability produce enough wheat may be behind the resurgence of heirloom grains. Also, we've been seeing a lot of comfort foods over the past few years that are pretty decadent and chock full of butter and cream. I think in 2013 there may be a backlash against these fatty comfort foods, and you'll see rich ingredients incorporated in a healthier way."

THE STAR ANIMAL
"Pig is still going to be boss."

 

paulsussman2
Paul Sussman, Back Deck

THE HOT TREND
"The push toward informal eating continues — eating at the bar, open kitchens, and simpler, less fussy dishes. I think we will delve deeper into South America — Peru, Chile, and Argentina — and with the interest in cooking whole animals and larger cuts of meat."

THE CULINARY CONTROVERSY
"One word: fish. The increasing scarcity of the more popular types of fish has given rise to both the controversy of misidentifying or mislabeling species of fish and to problems surrounding fish farming. More and more chefs are exploring lesser-known and more plentiful varieties."

THE STAR ANIMAL
"I love pork. There is no protein as versatile, but I sigh when I see menus where the chef has put pig meat in two thirds of the dishes. I don't know what the next star will be, but I'd like to see a balanced approach."

 

mattaudette2
Matthew Audette, Eastern Standard

THE HOT TREND
"I think the next big food trend for the coming year will be a bigger and deeper level of locavore and sustainability, with regard to more artisanal products like charcuterie, cheese, and booze."

THE CULINARY CONTROVERSY
"Genetically modified organisms for sure. A lot of the country is not fully sure of what they are eating, and I think that when they find out, there will be a serious change to the way that this country eats."

THE STAR ANIMAL
"Really tough call, but the pig will probably remain king."

 

tiffanifaison2
Tiffani Faison, Sweet Cheeks

THE HOT TREND
"I think we're going to see the continued exploration of what new New England food is — a bit in the way that classic Southern cuisine was adopted in a fresh way — and maybe some modern takes on Asian flavors."

THE CULINARY CONTROVERSY
"I think in Boston we'll be dealing with too many seats and not enough people. All these great restaurants are popping up in the suburbs — which is great — but if you live in X suburb and come into the city for dinner on the weekends, why would you do that if you've got a great restaurant near you? Plus, we've got some big-name chefs coming to Fort Point and the Seaport, along with some of the big-box restaurants. We've proven we're a worthy outlet for big names, but I think that will make it tough for young chefs."

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